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Our Super Secret Tricoque™ Technology (SSTT)

Posted by Carl Strong on Apr 4, 2018 4:07:50 PM

Because I just learned how to add the (™) I feel compelled to trademark something. Seems the industry likes to throw around the term "monocoque" quite a bit so I'm going to mix it up. At Pursuit we employ Tricoque™ technology. That's two better than monocoque. I kid, but in all seriousness we do build our front triangles in three pieces and here is an explanation to why.

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Topics: Tech

The ABD's of Composite Laminates

Posted by Jared Nelson on Apr 2, 2018 8:14:36 AM

It has been a while, but don’t worry, my students have been giving me plenty of blank stares in the meantime.  Seriously, I am teaching a course this semester called Design of Machine Elements which I consider a key opportunity for students to bridge their engineering knowledge toward their upcoming professional career.  Given the course is an elective, I have opted to not give exams, but instead assign regular engineering project problems. We discuss fasteners, bonding, shafts, gears, springs, etc. and discuss critical implications of fit, tolerancing, and perhaps most importantly the different means of engineering communication.  At the heart of every single problem, are load and deformation analyses. These analyses are much easier for well characterized, isotropic materials (e.g. steel, aluminum, cast iron), but become much more intensive as we change to a highly engineered, anisotropic material such as a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy.  

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Topics: Tech

Fibers That Play Together Stay Together

Posted by Kyle Rohan on Jan 19, 2018 12:03:39 PM
This is my 3rd installment of the four part series on carbon fiber composite materials. This one is on the matrix that holds it all together. Previous posts talked about making raw carbon, and how carbon is used in bicycle frames. And in the final installment of this 4 part series I will go all blue-sky wanderlust on emerging tech in the composite industry and yeah theres some cool stuff out there. To quote The Graduate "one word: plastics… theres a future in it”. 
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Topics: Tech

High Performance Is More Than Just Modulus

Posted by Kyle Rohan on Nov 16, 2017 11:35:40 AM

My name is Kyle and I am the guy that spends the most time with Carl building here at Pursuit Cycles. Head on over to my bio page to read a little more about me and my materials science background. In today’s post we will be covering the thing that makes up the majority of your bike. Carbon fiber. Around 60% by volume, epoxy, the remainder is something that we will talk about in the next blog post. After the epoxy post I will be writing the last of this 4 part series on potential new material technology in bicycles. But, in this post I will focus on the nuances of selecting carbon fiber for frame design.

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Topics: Tech

Advanced Bike Tech: Stressing the importance of measuring Strain

Posted by Jared Nelson on Sep 25, 2017 8:00:00 AM

Advanced Bike Tech

Carbon fiber frames are lightweight, but how light is too light? It requires a lot of engineering to make sure your frame is light and strong. 

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Topics: Tech

Your Carbon Bike is Made from Dinosaurs

Posted by Carl Strong on Apr 26, 2017 8:00:00 AM

I’m going to do a little 4 part mini-series on carbon fiber materials. In this first article we’ll cover where the actual individual fibers come from and in following articles we’ll discuss types of fibers; their characteristics, strengths and weakness. Then we’ll go over the epoxies(matrix) and finally we’ll discuss commercially available products that are commonly used in high-end carbon frames. For a deeper dive into how carbon fiber actually works, check out Jared’s series on anisotropy.

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Topics: Tech

How a Composite Tube May Differ From a Metal Tube

Posted by Jared Nelson on Apr 13, 2017 7:00:00 AM

So we left off last time discussing anisotropy; specifically how a composite tube may differ from a metal tube.  We have defined anisotropy as having different properties or responses in different directions.  It would be helpful if anisotropy were easy to visualize, but it is not.  Go perform an image search using “anisotropic material” and you may expect to see some nice images of anisotropy [1].  However, the search yields many images that when thought about and combined in various ways allow us to develop an understanding of anisotropy, but none clearly show anisotropy.  

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Topics: Tech

How A Carbon Bike Is Made

Posted by Carl Strong on Mar 21, 2017 8:00:00 AM

There are almost as many methods for making a carbon bike  as there are manufacturers. I think it’s fair to say that there is still a lot to be learned. That’s the fun part, there is plenty of room for improvement. While we all have our own variation on the theme, the bicycle industry has been using the same basic manufacturing processes for the last 20 years. There has been plenty of evolution in the form of small refinements which add up over the years, but not major incremental advancements.

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Topics: Tech

Everyone hates a know-it-all…except when it comes to composites

Posted by Jared Nelson on Mar 6, 2017 8:00:00 AM

We at Pursuit believe that an expert is not someone who knows all the answers, but instead knows the right questions to ask.  As noted below, I definitely do not know all the answers surrounding composites and it is our hope that through this Tech portion of the Pursuit Blog that we are able to investigate and discuss some of the pertinent questions.  In particular, we will focus on design, modeling, and manufacturing of composites as related to bicycle frames.  Below is the first step in that direction, where some of main hurdles of composite usage are discussed.  Finally, each Tech post will include credible references (a tip of the hat to Nate Silver [1]) so that readers may delve further into the topics addressed should they wish to do so.

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Topics: Tech

Always Get Better

THE PURITY OF THE PURSUIT

We want to go further, faster, more beautifully. To always get better. To keep proving and improving ourselves and the things we create. It’s in this pursuit that we find meaning and a never ending purpose.

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